Take A Hike – Part 1

Posted by Heather
In life
20Apr 10

     One of the main reasons we chose B.C.’s Sunshine Coast as our new home almost 2 years ago, was the fact that there are so many places to walk, hike, and kayak.  The older we get, the more we realize that you can’t lead a sedentary lifestyle and remain healthy.  Fresh air, sunshine and exercise can do wonders for the mind, body and soul.  Although most people know I am a ” City Girl ” to the core, I must admit that living up here has helped me learn to relax a little bit, and deal with stress in constructive ways.

     We have several places up here that we like to go hiking.  Today, I’m going to talk about Smuggler Cove.  It has an interesting history, and is a very enjoyable hike.

Map Of Smuggler Cove

Map Of Smuggler Cove

     One thing we really like about Smuggler Cove is that it is less than a half hour drive past Sechelt, so you don’t have to go too far to feel a million miles away.  It usually takes us about an hour to walk in, and an hour back, but that is with lots of stops for pictures along the way.  If you walked without stopping, it would probably only be about 45 minutes each way.

Beavers Flood The Trail

Beavers Flood The Trail

There is a marshy area when you start the hike, followed by some often-flooded areas, due to the resident beavers being hard at work building their dams.  This past year, some new walkways were built, making it easier for all to cross the more difficult spots.
Interesting Tree

Interesting Tree

There are definitely a lot of opportunities for some pretty cool pictures, if you have the time and inclination.  The scenery changes after the marshy, flooded areas, and starts to become more rocky, heading uphill.  We often see little snakes as we walk along.
Little Snake

Little Snake

One of the things I like best is looking up at how tall the trees are in the forest – I often take shots pointing my camera up at the sky.  It is sometimes hard to fathom just how long these beautiful trees have been alive.
Tall Trees

Tall Trees

When you get part way along the trail, you see the actual cove where Smugglers came to hide themselves, or their illegal booze.  When the tide is low, you can climb down fairly close to the water, and see colourful starfish just below the surface.
Smuggler Cove

Smuggler Cove

As you get towards the end of the trail, there are a lot of gorgeous Arbutus Trees.  I had never seen these trees before, and now they are one of my favourites, as they have such a distinctive look to them.
Arbutus Tree

Arbutus Tree

When you get to the end of the trail, there is a rock bluff overlooking the water.  We often take lunch with us, spread out a blanket, and enjoy the view for an hour or two.  It is very peaceful there, and I never tire of watching the sun sparkling on the water.
End View

End View

There are often boats in the Cove during the Summer, as well as an abundance of Kayakers. 
Kayakers

Kayakers

When I need to escape the daily routine of life, Smuggler Cove is a wonderful place to go.  There is so much to see, and it changes each time you go back.  I have thousands of photographs from hiking this trail over the past couple of years, but I never get tired of taking those pictures.  I find the light is most beautiful in the late afternoon – just a warm, golden glow.
Sun Sparkling On The Water

Sun Sparkling On The Water

I am so grateful to have such a gorgeous place to escape to when I feel the need.  The best part is, I can actually sleep fairly well after a good hike, and to this chronic insomniac, that’s a pretty good bonus.

2 Comments

  1. felisha, April 21, 2010:

    Those pictures are absolutely breathtaking! I’m a “city girl” as well, but hiking is my favourite non-city thing to do. I’m looking forward to getting out there this spring. Thanks for the inspiration. 🙂

  2. Duane Burnett, April 27, 2010:

    That is such a an amazing hike! I have taken photos of it for years and years now it seems. Always something new to enjoy every time! I also really get a kick out of the fact that the rum boats would hide for the law during the American prohibition in the cove, and that it was a popular are for First Nations and well maybe not as great a memory for the Chinese workers smuggled in to work on the rail way! Thanks for sharing your hike with us Heather! HUGS Duane

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